Tax Compromise- Nature, Effects and Legal Implications

If you have a large tax bill, you might consider offering a Tax Compromise to the IRS. You will have to pay the IRS the full amount if your claim is doubtful, or the taxpayer must pay at least 5% of the understated tax liability. But, if you think your claim is small, you may still consider this option. To begin, you must first determine whether your situation would be suitable for a Tax compromise.

Tax Compromise

The IRS is not likely to accept any offer that is lower than the taxpayer’s reasonable collection potential. However, if you are unable to pay the full amount owed to the IRS, you may want to consider an Offer in Compromise. Although the IRS does scrutinize these offers carefully, many people opt for this option. But, this is not for everyone. The IRS only accepts the lowest offers for tax debts if they meet certain requirements.

The process of applying for a Tax Compromise is simple and freeing. It saves the government money by allowing taxpayers to settle their tax debts in an easy manner. The BIR will give the taxpayer a set amount of money before accepting a compromise. In addition, the taxpayer does not have to worry about having to pay the full amount upfront. They can opt for a Tax Compromise as long as they have a reasonable financial ability to pay it.

The IRS will review the form 433 to determine the reasonable collection potential of the taxpayer. If you are unable to pay the full amount of the debt, the IRS may agree to a Tax Compromise. The amount of payment will be determined based on the person’s real and personal assets. If you cannot pay the full amount, the IRS will accept an Offer in Compromise. The taxpayer must have a reasonable collection potential, but it must also be a realistic one.

Once you have decided that your case qualifies, the IRS will consider the circumstances. If you qualify, the IRS may agree to accept a tax compromise if the taxpayer is unable to pay the full amount. The IRS will consider all of the factors involved in the proposed settlement. A person will get less than half of the tax owed through a Tax Compromise. If you have a reasonable income, the IRS may not accept the Offer, mentioned and discussed Missouri tax attorney.

There are two major types of tax compromise. A taxpayer may choose the best option if he has too much to pay. A taxpayer can submit an Offer in Compromise if he or she is able to afford the full amount of the taxes he owes. If the IRS rejects the Offer in Compromise, the taxpayer can make a lower payment. This type of payment is usually less than half of the total tax debt.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.